Local File Inclusion

Local File Inclusion – File inclusions can be discovered in the same way as directory traversals. We must locate parameters we can manipulate and attempt to use them to load arbitrary files. However, a file inclusion takes this one step further, as we attempt execute the contents of the file within the application. We should also check these parameters to see if they are vulnerable to remote inclusion (RFI) by changing their values to a URL instead of a local path. We are less likely to find RFI vulnerabilities since…

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What is Bypassing Authentication?

What is Bypassing Authentication? – In computer security, authentication is the process of attempting to verify the digital identity of the sender of a communication. A common example of such a process is the log on process. Testing the authentication schema means understanding how the authentication process works and using that information to circumvent the authentication mechanism. What if we could bypass all authentication mechanisms entirely? We can! This technique is called browser pivoting—essentially, we use our access to the target workstation to inherit permissions from the doctor’s browser and…

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What is Privilege Escalation?

An attacker can gain access to the network using a non-admin user account and the next step would be to gain administrative privilege escalation. Attacker performs privileges escalation attack which takes advantage of design flaws, programming errors, bugs, and configuration oversights in the OS and software application to gain administrative access to the network and its associated applications. These privileges allows attacker to view critical/sensitive information, delete files, or install malicious programs such as viruses, Trojan, worms, etc. Types of Privilege Escalation Privilege escalation take place in two forms. They…

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What is XML Vulnerability?

XML Vulnerability

An XML External Entity (XXE) vulnerability involves exploiting how an application parses XML input, more specifically, exploiting how the application processes the inclusion of external entities included in the input. To gain a full appreciation for how this is exploited and its potential, I think it’s best for us to first understand what the eXtensible Markup Language (XML) and external entities are. Also Read :- CSRF, XSS A metalanguage is a language used for describing other languages, and that’s what XML is. It was developed after HTML in part, as…

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Open Redirection

Open Redirection

According to the Open Web Application Security Project, an open redirection occurs when an application takes a parameter and redirects a user to that parameter value without any conducting any validation on the value. This vulnerability is used in phishing attacks to get users to visit malicious sites without realizing it, abusing the trust of a given domain to lead users to another. The malicious website serving as the redirect destination could be prepared to look like a legitimate site and try to collect personal / sensitive information. Check out…

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Cross-Site Request Forgery

Cross-Site Request Forgery

A Cross-Site Request Forgery, or CSRF, attack occurs when a malicious website, email, instant message, application, etc. causes a user’s web browser to perform some action on another website where that user is already authenticated, or logged in. Often this occurs without the user knowing the action has occurred. A successful CSRF exploit can compromise end user data and operation, when it targets a normal user. If the targeted end user is the administrator account, a CSRF attack can compromise the entire web application. The impact of a CSRF attack…

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CRLF Injection

CRLF Injection

What is CRLF? When a browser sends a request to a web server, the web server answers back with a response containing both the HTTP headers and the actual website content. The HTTP headers and the HTML response (the website content) are separated by a specific combination of special characters, namely a carriage return and a line feed. They are also known as CRLF. The server knows when a new header begins and another one ends with CRLF, which can also tell a web application or user that a new…

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