Google Warns of Zero-Click Bluetooth Flaws in Linux-based Devices

Google security researchers are warning of a new set of zero-click vulnerabilities in the Linux Bluetooth software stack that can allow a nearby unauthenticated, remote attacker to execute arbitrary code with kernel privileges on vulnerable devices. According to security engineer Andy Nguyen, the three flaws — collectively called BleedingTooth — reside in the open-source BlueZ protocol stack that offers support for many of the core Bluetooth layers and protocols for Linux-based systems such as laptops and IoT devices. The first and the most severe is a heap-based type confusion (CVE-2020-12351,…

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What Is Network Scanning?

Network Scanning

Network Scanning refers to a set of proceducers for identifying hosts, ports and services in a network. Network Scanning is one of the components of intelligence gathering an attacker uses to create a profile of the target organization. Objective of Network Scanning To discover live hosts, IP address, and open ports of live hosts. To discover operating systems and system architecture. To discover services running on hosts. To discover vulnerabilities in live hosts. Network Scanning phase includes probing to the target network for getting information. When a user probes another…

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What is Keylogger?

Keylogger

Keystroke logging(Keylogger) and Keyboard capturing is a process of monitoring or recording the actions performed by any user such as monitoring a user using Keyloggers. Keyloggers can be either hardware or software. The major purpose of using keyloggers are monitoring data copied to the clipboard, screenshots captured by the user, screen logging by capturing a screenshot at every moment even when the user just clicked. You Missed To Read :- Wifi-Hacking, Bluetooth Hacking. Legitimate applications for keyloggers include in office and industial settings to monitor employee’s computer activities and in…

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Bluetooth Hacking

Bluetooth Hacking

What is Bluetooth? Bluetooth is a universal protocol for low power, near field communication operating at 2.4 – 2.485 GHz using spread spectrum, frequency hopping at 1,600 hops per second (this frequency hopping is a security measure). It was developed in 1994 by Ericsson Corp. of Sweden and named after the 10th century Danish (Sweden and Denmark were a single country in the 10th century) King Harald Bluetooth. The minimum specification for Bluetooth range is 10 meters, but there is no limit to the range that manufacturers may implement in…

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